Gajanana Ganapati Gauri Ke Nandana – Archita Bhattacharya

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Based in Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, singer Archita Bhattacharya has undertaken post-graduation in Hindustani Classical vocals from the Indira Kala Sangeet University, Khairagarh, trained her voice in Kolkata, and has further supported it by also having learnt semi-classical and light classical music. In celebrating the festivities of the recent past, and in dedication to Lord Ganesh through music and, of course, through her voice, “Gajanana Ganapati Gauri Ke Nandana” – which I am given to understand is translated as “Worship the Lord of Lords, Lord Shri Ganesha, Lord of Demi-Gods and beloved of Gauri” – is set forth with that in mind and is presented here with minimal instrumentation, resulting in the track being very accessible and captivating. It also helps in recognizing the power of this music as Archita’s voice soars upwards and is then grounded as required to take you to an effective and auspicious devotional ride.

 

Listen and Download the songs here :http://www.artistaloud.com/ArchitaBhattacharya

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Intro – Vajra

Vajra

 

From 2008, this Mumbai-based band has been writing original compositions, headlining concerts at colleges, and has also won various competitions on the way. “Intro” is a quiet, atmospheric, and contemplative instrumental that provides the band an opportunity to communicate [their talent] without words. The guitaring is the band’s centrepiece as it provides sounds that are articulate, melodic, and well-defined as any in rock, as the tune rises to a crescendo, supported by appropriate percussion, providing further effectiveness to the composition. Depending on your mood, “Intro” provides a tangible atmosphere of bittersweet nostalgia that paradoxically seems to sum up the band’s forward movement in their career, with the track conjuring powerful and, more importantly, genuine feelings of mellowness, reminiscence, and wistfulness…

 

Listen and Download the songs here :http://www.artistaloud.com/vajra

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Pardesan Vich Punjabi – Pavneet Singh Birgi

3

A beautiful light guitar opening provides no clue as to what awaits the listener as “Pardesan Vich Punjabi” rolls into the atypical sound of beat-heavy bhangra. The exuberance of singer Pavneet Singh Birgi shows as lyrics underline the melody here. The dhol still figures heavily in providing rhythmic sounds, but it is a generally lighter than what one is generally accustomed to hearing. The end result is a joyous song from Pavneet that lies somewhere between electronica and Punjabi folk songs, updating the ancient bhangra genre, as many have done in the recent past, with a good show of skill. The lyrics are often simple chanted mantras repeating themselves for the duration of a song in conventional bhangra but, then again, on “Pardesan Vich Punjabi”, it is the musicality of the song that supports the lyrical content.

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Brishti – Azizul Abedin

1

From neighbouring Bangladesh arrives singer, songwriter, poet Azizul Abedin who found music was his passion during his youth, and played the harmonica and acoustic guitar, before diversifying into other instrumentation during recording. While he sings in his mother tongue, Bengali, the sum of his past – including studying in Liverpool – culminates in his composition, “Brishti”, which finds Azizul effectively utilising the spoken word, with mainly a keyboard playing in the background, to pay tribute to the learned wisdom of nostalgia and the innocent vulnerability of youth. Wonderfully crafted, and an unlikely hit song from an artiste who certainly tilts in favour of being a poet than a performer.

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Musafir- Ashwamedh

2

Big hooks and catchy riffs from Ashwamedh, on “Musafir”, solidifies the group’s status as one with a potential of being Indian metal’s top bands. Progressive elements and varying tempos add to their music, placing the melodic and the immediate on one side, and leaving crushing, alternating grooves, and unconventional structures as their attribute on the other, which works much better than might be imagined. Ashwamedh’s “Musafir” is certainly a good song, if not great, but it at least it helps define their best moments, deservedly as a leading contender for the heavy metal crown, but whose approach foreshadows an innate creative drive that should, hopefully and quickly, move away from rare into mainstream.

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Kaash — Kaash

3

Kaash is a Delhi based quintet that provides a fitting fast paced, energised song beginning with an infectious crescendo, painting an epic soundscape while setting the track up for big riffs, strong accents, and vocalist Viren’s first big shrieks. Though the opening scream appears a bit shaky by conventional standards, you soon realise that it is, in reality, Viren’s trademark, which makes the sounds of Kaash – both the band and the song – distinctive. The speed of the percussive elements are massive at times, symbolizing the immediacy of the band’s sound, which is extremely effective. Looks like metal is not only alive but, in fact, is well and kicking too!

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

Roko Na Mujhe – Sifar

1

From a project initiated by songwriter/producer Amit Yadav, Sifar is a band that commenced musical operations in 2008, going live from 2010 onwards. In honing their craft of metal, Sifar reached a crescendo of sorts with “Roko Na Mujhe” which got the band nominated in the “Best Rock Song” category at the annual ArtistAloud Awards. Deservedly so as the track is fairly straight-forward, revolving around solid riffing which vocalist Amit follows with his own rhythmic progressions, both on keyboards and on guitar. Focusing on huge guitar leads, Amit delivers top-shelf vocals, switching from single singing to roaring screams and even deep, ominous lows, which makes “Roko Na Mujhe” effective and anthemic.

- Review by PARAG KAMANI

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